Being Completely Ready to Attract New Clients and Win New Work

comments 18
Adding Value / Business / Comic Strips / Infographic / Promotion
The Red Lemon Club Essential Guide to... Being Completely Ready to Attract New Clients and Win New Work
A critical part of any prolific creative person or company's success and self-reliance is in generating new work or sales. Obviously.

Many of us, however, are harming our ability to do this with greater ease and effectiveness, simply because we are not prepared in the best way possible
This quick guide will introduce you to, or remind you of, the absolutely essential things that are in place before prospects come to you
1. Have a valuable product. It's important for your product (or service) to provide real value to people. As such, it is big time important to have spent enough time* on honing and refining a
quality product that is attractive to the people you are targeting towards.
*This should not be an excuse to never bring your work into the world; just don't put out crappy stuff.
2. Provide a professional service. Giving a professional service with your product includes being courteous, pleasant, fair, prepared and operating with a sense of urgency. Now, this won't be the most obvious element of anyone's business before people have even started working with you.
But potential clients WILL pick up on this earlier than you think, especially if you interact with them and clarify the service you will be providing. Your business could be an excellent service in itself.
but if you have a product that is coupled with poor service and no professionalism, it will suffer before it even gets going.
3. A means to demonstrate what you do. You will find it difficult for people to hire you based on your own assurances alone. Having an online presence to display your work in a clear and easy way to navigate is important.
I stress that this needs to be FREAKING easy for people to use. You have a massive opportunity to show off your work (whether this is through a portfolio, blog,
personal site, social networking gallery etc), so make your stuff clear, prioritise your best work, and get rid of anything else not up to a high standard. This also means cutting out the flash animations, tiny thumbnails and long load times.
You might also add some secondary 'pages' to support your demonstration of your best work, such as a bio and older, archived projects, for those who are interested in finding out a little bit more at that stage, if they choose to.
4. Final Call. It's the name of the game, people
You gotta make it extremely easy for people to take the last step in hiring you, or whatever it is you are selling/providing/ This means you need to make it clear how people can
contact you, buy something from you, ask you for an estimate, find out how to find your real-world business, download something, and so on. I call this your 'final call'. This appears in the following ways...
- A visible call to action. - Directions to a physical location. - A clear button or statement directed to information about your service. - Your contact details. You might be surprised how a little nudge like this can make a huge difference in the decisions people make.
Bonus. Not essential, but something that will tend to have a very positive effect on people's sense of your credibility...
...visible testimonials or quotes from people that have truly enjoyed your product or service in the past. 'OMG I loved working with Julia!'
Nothing beats this form of social proof in juicing up the decision-making process for potential clients, in working with you.
With all these in place, you are in a great position for prospects to connect with you and ultimately want to work with you.
Don't forget to join the club and sign up to the newsletter for extra tips, as well as sharing this post with those you know. Thank you!

The Author

Alex is a project starter, sometimes finisher, writer and illustrator. He started Red Lemon Club in 2009 with the aim of helping talented creative people leave their mark.

18 Comments

  1. Leila Fanner says

    I always appreciate you simple and straightforward, VERY OBVIOUS, tips that I sometimes need to hear over and over again to remind me. I have SO many areas to improve on my Art & Illustration site, it is so handy having a checklist like this to focus on: the important things first!

  2. Doron Meir says

    Good point about making it easy for people to see your stuff and to hire you… Can’t begin to tell you how many people I saw who create a killer portfolio and then send it without their contact details.

    I’d like to add something I’ve learned as a hiring supervisor: don’t make the package too fancy or original (animated website, amazing video-effects in your showreel etc.). When done poorly it’s annoying, when done well it often outshines the work itself. Either way you lose. Better to just keep it very simple and let the work itself speak.

  3. Leoni Selby says

    Again, great words! TNX!

    And I love the newsletter item about using the word ‘aspire’. I agree; the way you talk about yourself is the way you view yourself and subsequently the way people will view you.

    The thing is, I have been reading a lot of blogs about getting work and promoting yourself etc. and I have found myself to be doing almost everything right according to the experts. But as yet… to no avail! What’s going on? Does it simply need more time?

    • Alex Mathers says

      Thanks Leoni, I don’t know the exact situation, but if you’re not getting results, it’s because you’re not getting the right product in front of the right people who actually need it. Good luck with everything and thanks for the comments!

      Alex

  4. Pingback: Useful stuff from Red Lemon | Built Environment Photo

  5. Alex, thanks for inspiring articles! Thought I’ve been doing illustrations/designs for several years it’s only now I see the importance of the things you mention.

    BUT I still can’t figure out practically how to define your target audience (of course I read some marketing books and bla bla bla but things a bit different in commercial art industry)

    Maybe you can give a link to some good article or any advice?
    Thanks! Anya

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *